As seen on a day walk of discovery in the Sydney suburb of Bronte.

Bronte: A day walk in a Sydney Suburb.

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Bronte is next on my journey of discovery. A strange choice maybe, but I’ve discovered that Waverly Cemetery has a Bronte address. I’ve never been there and am keen to visit. I also want to see the sea again. And hopefully a whale.

I alight from the train at Bondi Junction and only wait a few minutes for the 440 bus to Bronte. I try to only use public transport on these trips and so far it has worked well. I have a short walk to the cemetery. Propped up against the metal gate is a box of flowers generously left by a local florist for visitors help themselves.

As seen on a day walk of discovery in the Sydney suburb of Bronte.

A pretty old cemetery

As seen on a day walk of discovery in the Sydney suburb of Bronte.

Generous Florist

I stop to look around me, to take in the atmosphere. A sombre place but strangely beautiful and steeped in history. The cemetery dates back to 1877. Located on the edge of cliffs near Bronte beach, the views are superb. It’s a place for a quiet peaceful reflection. I hear doves cooing and the occasional drone of an aeroplane.

I am looking for the graves of four well known identities using a rough map I prepared. At first I seem to be alone, but as I make my way downhill, I see a man sitting near some fresh flowers. He is lost in thought. I discretely walk past. White marble shines in the sun. It is a solemn place but an interesting one to wander through.

As seen on a day walk of discovery in the Sydney suburb of Bronte.

Henry Lawson rests here

As seen on a day walk of discovery in the Sydney suburb of Bronte.

Playing with black and white

Henry Lawson is buried here. I soon realise that my map, is inadequate. There are rows upon rows of graves. Fortunately, a rough sign indicates the aisle where he has been laid to rest. The simple grave, once in a state of disrepair, was restored with a government grant. A ring of shells has been placed near the modest headstone.

Continuing down the hill I realise that there are more people around. Rather than visiting departed loved ones, they are enjoying the coastal walk between Bondi and Coogee. The boardwalk, built to separate walkers from the graves, is closed due to storm damage and the coastal walk now diverts through the cemetery.

I pause to look out to sea. A couple of container boats and a whale watching tour boat are on the horizon. In the distance I see a spray of water. I am pretty sure there’s a whale out there, but it’s too far out for me to see clearly. I return my attention to the headstones, looking for Dorothea Mackellar, of ‘I love a sunburnt country’ fame. There she is, together with her brother.

As seen on a day walk of discovery in the Sydney suburb of Bronte.

Cricketer Victor Trumper remembered

As seen on a day walk of discovery in the Sydney suburb of Bronte.

Braving the cold

I notice other headstones. They remember a sailor, a judge, an artist. Young and not so young. The draped urns are thought to symbolise immortality. An unexpected death might be represented by a broken pillar. I see an Eastern Orthodox cross. It has two extra cross beams. There are wreathes and angels. I search for Fanny Durack, the Olympic swimmer, to no avail. I do find the test cricketer Victor Trumper without too much trouble.

I am surprised to see that I’ve been wandering around for over two hours, totally absorbed by my surroundings. It,s time to leave.  There is still more of Bronte to discover. The coastal walk towards Bronte Beach is easy to follow. I look back at the cemetery hugging the cliff face and then make my way to the beach. There’s a problem with the swimming pool and it’s empty of water and closed until further notice. The naturally formed rock pool or bogey hole provides a good alternative. I greet one of the hardy swimmers who has braved the cold water. He’s happy to tell me that he’s been in the water and is now going home for a few drinks.

As seen on a day walk of discovery in the Sydney suburb of Bronte.

Bronte Gully

As seen on a day walk of discovery in the Sydney suburb of Bronte.

the edge of the Bogey Hole

The winter swimming club, founded in 1921, claims to be the oldest in the world.  Bronte Surf Life Saving Club has a similar claim but this is disputed by the Bondi Surf Lifesavers.  The calm looking sea can be treacherous. There are some dangerous rips.

I walk past the covered picnic tables and grassed area towards Bronte Gully. A group of young men are playing football, others are cooking lunch on the BBQ and children are enjoying the well-equipped play area. Following the path, I hear the tinkle of water as I approach the small waterfall. Another place to sit and relax away from the busyness of everyday life.

Bronte House is next on my agenda. The house is behind a high fence and it,s difficult to get more than a glimpse of this oldest known residence in Waverley. Owned by Waverley Council, it is open to the public a number of days each year. Leo Schofield lived here for ten years and is credited with restoring the garden.

As seen on a day walk of discovery in the Sydney suburb of Bronte.

Only open on selected days

As seen on a day walk of discovery in the Sydney suburb of Bronte.

What can be seen from the road

I make my way back to the Three Blue Ducks on Macpherson St, for a late lunch.  A man walks past with fresh bread from nearby Iggy’s bread. They apparently make the best sourdough in Sydney. Conveniently my bus back to the city stops right there.

I’ve had a very pleasant day photographing and exploring Waverley Cemetery and discovering Bronte. I must return soon to do more of the Eastern Coastal Walk. Perhaps I’ll see a whale.

If you liked this post, you may also like to walk through

Haberfield               Cabramatta              Auburn

Next stop: Glebe

Useful information:

Take the train to Bondi Junction and then Bus 440 to Bronte or use Plan your trip.

Waverley Council can advise on Bronte House Open days.

Waverley Cemetery is open at different times depending on the time of year. Check their website.

The only map I could find to locate some of the graves: Note numbers 2,10, 21 and 24.

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And a map to assist you:

(If you would like a pdf of the map, email me via the contact page, and I will send one to you).

(NOTE that the time indicated on the map does not allow for any stops. I take an average of 4-5 hours when I explore):

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Comments

  1. Jim Carty

    Very nostalgic for me and my family- one of our relatives is buried there- I think it was my grandmother on Dad’s side but she died before my parents were married.
    My parents lived in a unit in Macpherson st with a great view of the ocean.
    The white ladies became grey ladies. They fell into the grave with the coffin as the shoring holding up the shifting sands collapsed ; or was it the Botany cemetery? But I am assured its a true story.
    Keep walking and sharing.
    warm regards
    jim

  2. Lindsay Nieminen

    I love the quiet of a cemetery like this. It reminds me of the ones we overlooked in the Montmartre district in Paris. You can just lose yourself among the headstones, imagining the lives of the people buried there!

    1. Author
      Joanne

      That’s exactly it. How different were their lives. Thanks Lindsay

  3. Shannon

    I love exploring cemeteries! There’s a strange, somber beauty to them. I think they also exist in a time bubble of some sort. While you’re in there time seems to stand still and it’s so easy to spend hours there without even realizing it.

  4. Megan Jerrard

    Glad you enjoyed your time discovering Bronte 🙂 The coastal walk towards Bronte Beach is one of my favorite things to do in Sydney – should be starting to get quite nice now that the weather is leading us into summer 🙂

  5. Natasha

    This is a great resource for anyone wishing to explore Sydney further than just the typical fare. It’s been years since I was in Sydney, but I hope very much to go back someday and see Bronte.

    1. Author
      Joanne

      Thank you Natasha. I am enjoying sharing Sydney with others as I explore further.

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